Publications & Podcasts

Trick or Treat? Popular AIA 2007 Design and Construction Contracts No Longer Available After October 31, 2018

September 27, 2018 Alerts and Newsletters

Ready or not? The 2007 versions of several popular American Institute of Architect (AIA) contracts will be phased out on Halloween. Owners, contractors and design professionals that have not switched over to AIA's 2017 documents need to make that transition now. The 2007 versions of the following will not be available as of November 1st:

A101 (Owner-Contractor Agreement - Stipulated Sum)

A102 (Owner – Contractor Agreement – Cost Plus Fee with GMP)

A103 (Owner – Contractor Agreement – Cost Plus Fee with no GMP)

A107 (Abbreviated Owner – Contractor Agreement – Limited Scope

Project)

A401 (Contractor – Subcontractor Agreement)

B101 (Owner- Architect Agreement)


The updated 2017 documents contain both substantive and format updates, including the addition of a new, separate insurance exhibit for construction. Make sure that you understand how the new AIA contracts could affect your project. Owner, contractors and design professionals that are currently preparing contracts that will not be finalized and signed until November should consider switching to the new contract forms.

In addition to updating these (and other) contract documents, AIA also updated A201 General Conditions of the Construction Contract. A201-2007 will remain available until the end of May 2021. The 2017 version of A201 should be used with 2017 agreement forms. The existing A201-2007 may continue to be used with AIA's A133-2009 (Owner - Construction Manager Agreement with GMP) which will be updated in 2019.


If you have question about which contracts to use or what's different about the new AIA documents, please call or email our construction attorneys:

Rob Ruesch[email protected], 207-253-4619
John Giffune [email protected] 207-253-4646
Brian O'Rourke [email protected] 617-274-2868

___________________________________________________________________
This communication is intended for general information purposes and as a service to clients and friends of Verrill Dana, LLP. This publication, which may be considered advertising under the ethical rules of certain jurisdictions, should not be construed as legal advice or a legal opinion on any specific facts or circumstances, nor does it create attorney-client privilege.

Contact Verrill at (855) 307 0700